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could not, of course or his threat would no longer be credible. talk about the loneliness. ike me all about the burden, from the north african campaign in 1943 to d-day to the conquest of germany, and the liberation of europe. ike smoke four packs a day as a general. he quit cold turkey in 1949. i gave myself in order to quit, he said. ike was pretty beat up, he had a major heart attack in 1955. a small stroke in 1957. the doctors worked about as high blood pressure were always ordering him to worry less. just what do they think this job is, he said? he tried to relax by playing golf. he played 800 times as president, a record. the golf may be the wrong game for perfectionist. ike can be pretty grim on the course and he wants to a chipping wedge at his doctor. ike had a huge temper which he kept hidden from the public but not his aides. his mother was a fundamentalist like to quote the bible and she would say to him, he that congress is old so is he -- ike would say his mother taught him how to control his temper. one of his aides said i thought what a poor job she had done. [laughter
them. he could not, of course, or the threat would not be credible. talk about the loneliness of command. ike knew about the command from the north after -- africa campaign, d-day, germany, and liberation of europe. ike smoked four packs a day as a general, quit cold turkey in 1949. he gave himself an order to quit, he said. he had a heart attack in 1955, and operation in 1956, a small stroke in 1957, doctors worried about the blood pressure and ordering him to worry less. what do they they the job is, he said? he tried to relax playing golf. he played 800 times as president, a record, but golf was the wrong game for a perfectionist. he was grim on the course, and once through a chipping wedge at a doctor, howard snyder, when snyder tried to make him feel better about a shot from the bunker. he had a tumper. his mother would quote the bible saying he the conquer their own soul is greater than he who takes a city. ike would say his mother taught him how to control the temper. one of the aids said i thought what a poor job she had done. [laughter] when he was mad, he was like te
common thing in high schools. so the shooter is a much bigger tip of the iceberg in loneliness and rejection and most people get past it and go on past high school, but those who suffer a particularly, treatment form of mental illness take every slight as a magnified catastrophe and it means something more serious to them than to the ordinary kid that gross out of it and doesn't enjoy it either. >> is there a threshold or an age if it's not dealt with at that time that this person will only get worse and it will fester and turn into something like this, a violent rampage? >> we know these mental disturbances that often characterize shooters begin in adolescence and they're very difficult to identify at that age, but if they manage to make it to their 20s it becomes a more fluid form that we are able to identify and that's one of the hardest things about this particular shooting and once someone gets beyond high school where we see them in a social setting it could be much harder. >> katherine newman, appreciate it. >> robert f. kennedy's daughter weighs in on the gun control de
? desire, loneliness, the hobbled search for justice and for just one thing that is lucky or fair, these are some of the timeless themes literature has explored from the beginning, and this year is no exception. the finalists are junot diaz, this is how you lose her. [cheers and applause] finish -- published by riverhead books, an imprint of pepping win group -- penguin group with, usa. dave egger, a hologram for the king -- [applause] published by mcsweeny's books. louise erdrich, the round house, published by harper, an imprint of harpercollins. [applause] ben fountain, billy lynn's long -- [inaudible] [applause] published by echo press, an imprint of harpercollins. kevin powers, the yellow bird. published by little brown. [applause] the 2012 national book award for fiction dose -- goes to "the round house", by louise erdrich. [applause] ♪ ♪ hey, baby, where are you is? [laughter] [applause] [laughter] >> wow. hello, my relatives. [speaking in native tongue] national book foundation and also the judges, and a shout out for all of the native people who are watching this live
a creature as fierce as it was tragic. its intense loneliness matched only by the fear it inspired far and wide. you see, the minotaur had a voracious appetite which can only be satiated with/. the king, who secured peace, the one who enabled trade to crisscross the seas with bountiful ships -- alas, the beast's appetite could only be satiated by human flesh. every now and then by ship loaded with young slaves was bound to greece to deliver its human tribute to be devoured by the minotaur. i grew some ritual that was essential for preserving the peace and producing trade and prosperity. many years later a global minotaur rose up from the ashes of the first postwar face. it is there -- a form of labyrinth was greeted deep in the american economy. it of the form of the united states trade deficit which consumes the world's exports. the more the deficit grew, the greater its appetite for europe and asia as capital, and what made it truly global with its expansion. it took financial capital and kept the cleaning german factories busy. it gobbled up everything produced in japan and later in
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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